Why Replace Missing teeth

Coronavirus COVID-19

 

Following the Prime Minister’s recent announcement, you will be pleased to know, we will remain open!

There are no restrictions with regards to medical /dental treatment and you are actively encouraged to keep your appointments.

Just to reiterate when you arrive at the Practice:

·      We advise that you always wear a mask while inside the dental practice and only remove your mask at the request of the dental professional.

·      Please do not arrive more than 5 minutes early for an appointment due to social distancing guidelines.

·      As you enter the building you will need to use the alcohol disinfectant rub to disinfect your hands.

In the meantime, please stay safe and contact us if you have any questions

NHS appointments are in very high demand and we may be unable to offer appointments for non urgent treatment and waiting times for NHS treatments may be several weeks.

 
  • When a tooth is missing, the remaining teeth have space to drift or overerupt.
  • Spaces are created between teeth where food becomes trapped which can lead to a build up of plaque. If these teeth are not kept clean, decay can result and they can be lost and the whole process starts again.

 

Bone Changes after Extraction

  • When teeth have been missing for some time, the bone and gums can begin to change shape.
  • This can affect surrounding teeth.

 

Ridge Preservation

  • Once a tooth is lost, the bone and gum will begin to recede. If you later decide to have an Implant fitted this bone recession may mean that the Implant would sit too high or the Crown would sit too low for your 'bite'.
  • A material can be inserted into the cavity to encourage bone re-growth. Over time, this will provide a sufficient amount of bone to support the Implant.